The Infancy of Visual Consulting

on November 16, 2010

Raise your hand if you work for a consulting firm.
Raise your hand if your work has ever given you the opportunity to work closely with consultants.
Raise your hand if your company has ever hired consultants.

That’s a lot of hands up.

Business and management consulting has a rather long history starting around the turn of the last century with companies like Arthur D. Little and Booz Allen Hamilton – then really taking off after WWII with Boston Consulting, McKinsey, and others.

However, visualization in business consulting is in its infancy.  In the last 20 to 30 years, the power of infographics in magazines and newspapers and visual companies have tapped into something powerful in the way humans process and understand complex ideas.

Check out an interesting site that has begun organizing this type of information:
visual-literacy.org

Visualization to express complex business strategies isn’t a “fad” that might die. We’re on the vanguard of what might be truly groundbreaking and industry-shaking.  What if, in 30 or 40 years, no one even thought about doing business consulting without visualization?

For those of us who create visual business learning, this is the call for those who long to be part of “something bigger than ourselves.” This means actively improving the connections between leaders, doers, and their ideas to improve job performance, job satisfaction, business strategy execution, and ultimately “success” in any way that it might be defined.

The great illustrator Andrew Loomis said in his book Creative Illustration “I wish you to succeed as much as I wish to succeed myself, for the sake of our craft, which is more important than we are.”

Drawing thoughts in pictures, charts, or graphics is used by almost everyone is some way. I spend my working day devoted to visualization, so in the spirit of constant improvement, I’d love to know how others are using it in their lives.  Where has visualization made a difference in how you solve problems personally or professionally?

Thinking

Managing Change
Managing Change